Inspiring the young people of the Draper and neighbouring estates through filmmaking and the performing arts.

2019 COURSE

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The Draper Voices Project.

 
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Filmmaking.

Students will produce a short Documentary film, using interview skills to capture the stories of residents of the Drapers Estate.

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Singing.

Students will develop the confidence to execute a variety vocal sounds through the use of different vocal techniques.

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Animation.

During the course the students will be aiming to create sequences of animation that will be used in the ‘Draper Voices’ documentary using Adobe Creative Suite.

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Photography.

Students will produce a series of documentary photographs using interview skills to capture the stories of residents of the Draper Estate.

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FILMMAKING

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Objectives:

Students will produce a short Documentary film, using interview skills to capture the stories of residents of the Drapers Estate. Additional footage will be used for the Draper Voices Archive project as well as being incorporated into Toxic Berry Man Productions, documentary; The Block.

Students will learn a range of film production skills including pre-production, filming (camera, directing, interviewing and audio) and post production (editing).

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Learning objectives and activities:

Interviewing People:

Students will take it in turns to interview each other to identify what kinds of questions provide the most useful information as well as learning how best to ask questions to get the information from the interviewee (i.e closed questions vs open questions). From this students can begin to think about the questions they will ask residents, identifying key themes which they may want to explore with interviewees and the best techniques for capturing stories.

Using the camera (framing):

Students will take it in turns to try a variety of shots (close ups, mid shots, longs shots) and camera angles (low angle, high angle, tracking shots and panning shots) to learn about how the camera can help tell, and influence, the way in which we connect with the story. As a group we will then explore which kind of shots work best for certain environments or interviews (i.e, would a panning shot be best for an interview with an individual? When would an extreme close up be helpful? etc)


Setting the Scene:

Students will learn how to ‘set up’ a shot. What is useful, visually, to the story they are telling? What, how and where to position an interviewee and how lighting and background action influence the ways in which the ‘viewer’ approaches the story

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Groups activities:

Take it in turns to take the role of interviewee/interviewer asking different kinds of questions to try and get the most information. Look at what works/what doesn’t work, for each role in order to identify the most effective interview styles.

Film each other from different angles and in different spaces to identify how framing changes how we connect to the interviewee.

Take it in turns to take on the role of Director, Camera person and Sound person and learn how each role comes together to create a short sequence.

Using short film sequences, identify cuts and transitions; how often they occur and how they help the story develop. Students can clap each time they see a cut or transition and discuss what they notice about each occasion.

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Planning a documentary

Students will learn about the main themes of a documentary production; subject, characters and structure, and how they relate to narrative storytelling (what is it about, who is it about, how does it develop?). Using the Drapers Estate as the subject, students will think about who the characters are and what information they need to gather from them in order to tell the wider story (what is the first thing the audience needs to see/hear to be introduced to this story and where does that story need to end up?)


Pre-Production:

Research is an important part of the planning process to build the best picture of the interviewee. It helps us to identify key themes which we can explore during the interview process, as well as learning how/where their story fits into the wider story.

Prior to filming, students will identify their interviewees and the specific interview questions that they want to ask them, as well as where they want to interview them and what visual tools they may want to use.

Students will then design storyboards for each interviewee before beginning filming

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Filming the Documentary

Students will use the range of skills they have learnt to film their documentary. Having identified the interviewees, themes for interview and any additional shots, camera and directing skills, students will spend several weeks gathering footage. Taking it in turns to take on the different roles of a professional production team, each person will have the opportunity to take the lead on a different aspect of the documentary process.

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Post-Production

Editing brings all the pieces of the filmmaking process together like a jigsaw puzzle. Students will learn how to cut a sequence, create transitions between multiple sequences and add titles and credits to cottage in order to piece the production together into a finished short film.

 

COURSE TUTORS

 
 

 

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SET DESIGN

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Introduction

This pathway aims to understand and explore the role of the set and costume designer for live performance.

We will look at how to create a visual response to the story of the BRISTOL BUS BOYCOTT 1963 through drawing and making tasks, using research both as a group and individually. Students will create a prop, set or costume design relating to the topic. We will also be working as a group on a ‘realised’ design and make for ‘show week’.

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Course Overview

· What is the role of the designer?

· What is the role of the maker?

· Identifying different types of theatre spaces

· Theatre glossary terms

· Devised vs. scripted – how to design for different formats (for example designing in the rehearsal room)

· How to establish ‘place’ in your theatre space – using visual research and the history of the Bristol Boycott 1963, looking at colours and textures as a response

· Looking at character and relationships

· Exploring drawing, painting, collage, model making, story boarding, moodboards for design and final outcomes

· Working together in creating a ‘realised’ outcome on stage

 

 

COURSE TUTORS

 
 
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animation

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WHY ANIMATION?

Animation is a diverse and dynamic medium in which images or objects are manipulated to appear as a moving sequence. There are several types and styles of animation including: Traditional animation, 2D Vector-based animation, 3D computer animation, Motion graphics & Stop motion. Our course focuses on Motion Graphics and Stop Motion Animation.


During the course the students will be aiming to create sequences of animation that will be used in the ‘Draper Voices’ documentary. This will include: Opening titles, lower thirds, infographics & credits!

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Storyboarding &

Visual language

The students will work on developing their storytelling & visual communication skills. Working closely with each other and the tutors on how best to bring their script and vision to life. This will include: Character Design, Colour psychology & developing a brand / style.

Animation is a medium that involves a lot of patience, hard work and dedication. Animating a piece teaches the importance of workflow, as well as how to better visually communicate and demonstrate your brief. In creating the 1-2 minute piece, the students will take away software skills that are instrumental in the media industry.

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OBJECTIVES:

Opening Titles

The students will develop and animate the opening title sequence for the ‘Draper Voices’ documentary. In creating this, the students will learn about themes, colour theory, typography & graphic design. The chosen theme for this will follow through to the rest of the documentary graphics.

Broadcast Package

As a team, the students will then also work together to create a full ‘broadcast package’ including Lower Thirds (Displaying the residents name as they are interviewed) and credits!

Infographics

Alongside the broadcast package, the students will also learn how to create mini infographics to accompany the piece to cameras from the Draper Estate residents, animating their stories and the ever changing landscape of Elephant & Castle.

 

COURSE TUTORS

 
 
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Singing

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SINGING

Students will develop the confidence to execute a variety vocal sounds through the use of different vocal techniques.

Students will demonstrate the ability of understanding how the voice works physiologically.

Students will generate an understanding of the physiological aspects of singing techniques (and terminology), in a fun and accessible way.

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Learning Activities

Students will learn about a cross section of different vocalists, covering a broad range of music genres. They will discuss and explore the various techniques used and experiment with them personally.

Students will discover how particular vocal traits can be linked to specific countries and cultures. Through research, they will be able to identify why this might be the case.

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Group Activities

Through a number of fun and creative activities, student will have the opportunity to develop the skills outlined above.

Students will have the opportunity to play, work and support each other through singing, movement and drama based games.

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Performance skills

Through a variety of individual and group activities, the students will be able to develop their performance skills.

Students will be given a safe performance platform where they can develop their sense of confidence.

Students will develop stage presence and stage ‘ready’ performance skills.

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Songwriting

Students will explore and discuss songwriters spanning across different eras and music styles.

Students will work collaboratively, whilst developing their own personal songwriting styles.

Students will have to the confidence to take ownership of their work – whilst supporting and encouraging their fellow students.

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The Final Project

Executing all of the skills developed throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively to perform the original songs they’ve written.

The original material will reflect the singer/songwriters that have been researched, with the original touches and experiences of the students from the Draper Academy.

 

COURSE TUTOR 

 
 
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photography

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LEARNING OBJECTIVES & ACTIVITIES

Students will produce a series of documentary photographs using interview skills to capture the stories of residents of the Draper Estate.

Students will learn a range of digital photographic skills including portraiture and environment, composition, light and storytelling.

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LEARNING OBJECTIVES & ACTIVITIES

Portraiture and environments:

Students will learn about different kinds of photography including portraiture, and environmental portraiture. They will experiment with a range of techniques relevant to these styles of photography.

Using the camera for composition (framing):

Students learn about some of the key aspects of composition in photography, and what makes a well composed image. Students will take it in turns to try a variety of exercises such as close ups, mid shots, long shots, and different camera angles.

Light

Students will use a different range of lights, including natural light, on-camera flash, available light, and off-camera flash.

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Storytelling

Students will learn about how the camera can help tell, and influence, the way in which we communicate a story. As a group we will then explore which kind of shots work best for certain environments or types of story.

Research is an important part of the planning process to build the best picture of the subject, as well as learning how/where their photographs fit into the wider story.

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GROUP ACTIVITIES

Students will take part in a range of fun and creative activities that will build their skills in the areas mentioned above.

The students will practice taking portraits of each other both in the learning space, and while exploring the local area. Students will work to specified tasks for the photo shoots, and talk about the outcomes as a group.

They will photograph each other from different angles and in different spaces to identify how composition changes how we connect to the subject. Take it in turns to take on the role of photographer, lighting assistant and subject, and learn how each role comes together to create either a single image, or series of photographs.

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THE FINAL PROJECT

Students will work together in small teams to photograph selected residents of the Draper Estate. During this process the team will apply the skills they have learnt on the course to produce a final collection of images that tells the stories of the residents. The collection will be made of portraits and environmental shots of the Draper Estate. The students will work together to edit and put together the final collection of images.

 

 COURSE TUTORS

 
 
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